Research of the Pros of Homework, Part 1

Research indicates that homework in general is extremely beneficial for students.  The supporting research is somewhat dichotomous indicating (1) objective benefits ascertained from standardized test scores, and (2) subjective benefits ascertained from parents, teachers, and the students themselves.

"[H]omework's effect on achievement can be described most accurately as above average," claims Harris Cooper in "Homework Research and Policy: A Review of Literature." (March 2000)  Cooper indicates that, of twenty studies completed since 1962, fourteen are pro-homework.  Of fifty studies correlating the time on homework with student achievement, Cooper states that forty-three of the studies showed students who did homework had better achievement.  A typical homework-completing high school student, according to Cooper's research, will outperform students who do not do homework by 69% on standardized tests.

Debbie Reese in "Homework: What Does Research Say?", reinforces the data presented by Cooper.  She also adds more data that runs consistent in much of the available data on homework: on standardized tests, homework-completing junior high students outperform homework non-completers by 35%.  There seems to be no difference in scores in the elementary grades. (Reese, 1997)

By simply evaluating the effectiveness of homework using behaviorist evaluation techniques such as standardized testing, one can ascertain that the short-term stimulus of assigning homework reaps the long-term response of improved student achievement.

A typical homework-completing high school student will outperform students who do not do homework by 69% on standardized tests.

Home Page | What is Dialectical Constructivism? | The Perceived Problem with Homework | Research of the Pros of Homework, Part 1 | Research of the Pros of Homework, Part 2 | Research of the Cons of Homework | Concerns Affecting Homework, Part 1 | Concerns Affecting Homework, Part 2 | Suggestions for Teachers | Conclusions